Trump Lost Once Again

Donald Trump’s tax records are now in the hands of the New York district attorney. Prosecutors obtained the “millions of pages of documents” on Monday, just hours after the Supreme Court denied Trump's last-ditch effort to keep the records private.

At the helm of the most significant criminal investigation facing the twice impeached Trump, his family, and his business, Manhattan's top prosecutor reportedly faces a daunting task heading into his final months in office while sifting through millions of newly obtained pages of his financial records.

Cy Vance once ordered his prosecutors to drop a promising criminal-fraud investigation against Ivanka and Donald Trump, Jr., who were suspected of misleading potential buyers of condos in the Trump SoHo building. This occurred after their father’s attorney, Marc Kasowitz, reportedly met with Vance and raised more than fifty thousand dollars for Vance’s reëlection campaign. He let them off with a slap in the wrist, but this time Trumps small hands are going inside the shark tank. Vance better learn how to dance around with a security team that wears body armor and be very careful where he eats and drinks because as an old teacher who was fond of phrases used to say... A word to the wise is sufficient.

Speaking of words spoken - Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes. These were the words of our founding father — Benjamin Franklin, in a letter to Jean-Baptiste Le Roy, 1789.

Today the world learned the real meaning of these famous words as they refer to an infamous deadbeat who continually lied to Americans, but in the end, the liar’s pants go on fire, skipping rhyme occasionally skipping-rope rhyme or jump-rope rhyme, is a rhyme chanted by children while skipping. Such rhymes have been recorded in all cultures where skipping is played. Examples of English-language rhymes have been found going back to at least the 17th century. Like most folklore, skipping rhymes tend to be found in many different variations. The article includes those chants used by English-speaking children.

Then, the emperor has no clothes. The Emperor’s New Clothes" was first published with "The Little Mermaid" in Copenhagen, by C. A. Reitzel, on 7 April 1837, as the third and final installment of Andersen's Fairy Tales Told for Children. The tale has been adapted to various media, and the story's title, the phrase "The Emperor has no clothes", and variations thereof have been adopted for use in numerous other works and as an idiom.

Finally, What goes up must come down. Anything that has risen or been raised up must eventually fall down.